A Brew is Born WELCOME Fellow Beer Lover

From first sip to last drop, you can taste the expert craft
that goes into all of our beer. Check out the whole process
for yourself, from promising start to rewarding finish.

Our Water

BridgePort was founded and is based in Portland,
Oregon. And like any Portland citizen, we have
some of the best water in the world right from
the tap. The source of the water is a Mt. Hood
watershed reservoir called Bull Run, and it's
almost too good for brewing.

Keg and Bottle Conditioning

Some of our brews develop even more character through
secondary fermentation in the keg or bottle. This gives
them an especially creamy head and natural carbonation
right from the container

Base Malt

Provides the foundation of flavor, color and extract.
Ferments into alcohol and carbon dioxide (carbonation) while adding the malty backbone flavors to the beer.

Dark Malt

Adds deeper color and roasted flavor. Examples
include caramel malts, black malt and roasted barley.

Wheat Malt

For mouthfeel and haze.

Rye Malt

Gives a distinctive reddish hue
and drier mouthfeel.

Milling

To begin the brewing process, the grains must be cracked
to encourage water absorption and the conversion of
starch to sugar. The right grind is important. If the malt is
milled too finely, it will produce too much flour and
pulverize the husk. If it's too coarse, it won't produce
enough sugar for fermenting.

Delivered from the Great Western Malting Co.
Vancouver, WA

Mash/Lauter Tun

This is where the milled malt, or GRIST, is mixed
with hot water to allow the enzymes in the grist to
convert the grain's starch to sugar. This process is
called MASHING. The sugar-rich liquid that's
produced is LAUTERED, or strained through the
malt husks. The result is called sweet WORT and
is then transferred to our brew kettle.

Brew Kettle

Once all of the sweet wort is in the kettle, the
temperature is raised to boiling and hops are
added. Boiling the wort extracts hop flavors, and
bittering and deactivates the enzymes that are
active during mashing and lautering.

Aroma Hops

Once all of the sweet wort is in the kettle, the
temperature is raised to boiling and hops are
added. Boiling the wort extracts hop flavors, and
bittering and deactivates the enzymes that are
active during mashing and lautering.

Bittering Hops

These are added to the brew kettle for initial
bittering of the wort. Large amounts of bittering hops
make the final beer more bitter but add a lot of hop
flavor as well. Hops are also bacteriostatic which
means that added hops help keep the finished
product from spoiling.

Yeast

Our yeast is a carefully chosen strain of Ale
yeast that ferments very aggressively,
usually reaching TERMINAL GRAVITY
within five days.

Fermentation

Yeast is added to the wort to begin fermentation. When the sugars are metabolized by the yeast to produce alcohol and carbon dioxide, the complex flavors result in the beautiful brews we call Bridgeport Ales. Fermentation at Bridgeport takes anywhere from 5-7 days. Once fermentation is complete, the ale is cooled to 32 degrees F. The beer is then separated from the yeast and moved to a tank to await final filtration and bottling.

Uncommon Flavors

Sometimes a special brew warrants a little something
extra. Our limited-release and seasonal beers often
include the kinds of ingredients you may not
naturally associate with the brewing arts. We like
to think of them as extra-credit flavors.

Yuzu Fruit

We add a touch of this just
after filtration to a give the
brew a characteristic
Mandarin citrus note.

Berries & Cherries

Locally sourced fruit is
sometimes added to
seasonal beer for a unique
flavor base and a little extra
sugar during fermentation.

Barrel Aging

Sometimes we wood or
barrel-age a beer to add a
special flavor. This process
usually works best for big,
malty beers.

Sustainability

It doesn't matter who you are. You can't live in Portland
without living sustainably. Coincidentally, brewing has an
inherently sustainable side: heat exchangers are integral
to the brewing process, and we re-use heat within the
building. Our malts and bottles come from eight miles
away. Spent grain and yeast are used as feed in a local
dairy. We compost. We recycle. We keep a small footprint.
Brewing is one of the many ways nature is nice to us. We
try to be nice in return.

All that virtual brewing
make you thirsty? Thought so.
See Where you can find your
favorite Bridgeport ales.